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Additional Questions on PEACH for importing plants for planting and other commodities

On 22 July 2022, a new GB focused risk-based inspection regime has been introduced across England, Scotland and Wales. Additionally, a new flat-rate fee will apply across England and Wales for physical and identity checks on imports of most plants for planting and cuttings. 

Those importing plants for planting and other commodities using PEACH will be asked some additional questions during their application: 

For plants for planting:  

1) Is the commodity a woody plant?  

2) Are the plants for direct retail sale?   

3) Are the plants intended for use as indoor plants? 

For seeds: 

1) Are the seeds intended for trial or testing purposes? 

For Bulbs: 

Whether the plants are for direct retail sale, commercial flower production (finished) or for propagation  

The following guidance can be used to help answer these questions. 

What is a woody plant?

Within our legislation a woody plant is defined as:

“Woody plants” means plants which have a woody or partly woody stem, and includes all trees, forest reproductive material (other than seed), shrubs and palms, and those vines and perennial herbs with woody or partly woody stems; and for this purpose “perennial herbs” means herbs for which the average life exceeds two years.”

Annex I lists some of the genera that can be classed as non-woody.

What do we mean by ‘are the plants for direct retail sale’?

Within our legislation plants for direct retail sale are Intended for final users, specifically ”means intended, by evidence from the packaging, labelling or by other means, for direct supply to final users”.

The intended use of a plant has a significant impact on the biosecurity risk it poses, in so far as the likelihood of introducing (= entry + establishment) a pest or disease. Plants intended for further propagation, growing on, or multiplying on a commercial scale provide greater potential for pests and diseases, where present, to spread and multiply, often with a ready and dense stock of viable hosts in close proximity. Those intended for final users pose a relatively lower biosecurity risk, with reduced potential for pest and disease transfer on a large scale.

The UK Plant Health Service continuously reviews new, emerging and changing biosecurity threats, to ensure our high plant health status is maintained. The frequency of checks which applies to different plant species, intended for different purposes, from different origins is adjusted over time in line with this risk-management approach.

In many cases it is self-evident whether or not a plant is intended for direct retail sale for the final user, but there are some circumstances where it isn’t so clear. To help, we have provided some generic scenarios to illustrate whether plants should be categorised as intended for the final user, together with some category specific cases where, by exception, particular plants may be classified as such. If you remain unclear, please contact your local plant health inspector who will be to advise you further, or you can contact the Animal and Plant Health Agency’s helpdesk at planthealth.info@apha.gov.uk or phone 0300 1000 313 (for England and Wales), or for Scotland please contact the Horticulture and Marketing Unit (HMU) hort.marketing@gov.scot who will continue to undertake all physical inspections in Scotland.

Scenario

Description

Plants for direct sale intended for final user?

1.

Plug bedding plants that are imported by a commercial nursery and are immediately re-potted before sale to final consumers (either directly, or via another operator/business)

Yes

2.

Plug bedding plants that are imported by a commercial nursery, maintained in their current state and are not grown on. Sold on to private individuals by mail order (either directly, or via another operator/business)

Yes

3.

Plants (including aquatics) and plant products (e.g. seed) which are imported to a GB business and immediately packaged for sale to final consumers (e.g. seed imported in bulk and immediately separated in small packets ready for sale to final users). This applies to both direct and indirect (i.e. via another operator/business) supply to the final user

Yes

4.

Plants sold on the internet to final users via distance contracts

Yes

5.

Young plants/cuttings imported by a commercial nursery, to retain on site for growing on to a different state, before sale to other businesses or final consumers

No

6.

Plug plants intended for commercial crop production (e.g. tomato plants to be planted on for production of tomato fruit)

No

7.

Trees of any size, imported to plant on at end-customer’s premises, e.g. building site or landscaping project. This includes bare-rooted trees which are potted on to sustain them before moving to the customer’s premises.

No

8.

Seed imported and intended for production of a crop which is destined for marketing or re-planting (i.e. farm saved seed)

No

9.

Plants such as fruit trees imported for planting into an orchard for fruit production

No

10.

Plants sold on the internet to commercial growers who will use the plants to produce a crop

No

11.

Plants (including aquatics) and plant products (e.g. seed) which are imported to a GB business and immediately packaged for sale to final consumers (e.g. seed imported in bulk and immediately separated in small packets ready for sale to final users). This applies to both direct and indirect (i.e. via another operator/business) supply to the final user.

Yes

Scenarios specific to a category of plant

12.

Seed potatoes: intended for any type of commercial production/propagation, to produce seed potatoes, ware potatoes, farm saved seed

No

 

What is an indoor plant?

Within our legislation an indoor plant is defined as:

Indoor plants ” means plants which appear from their packaging, labelling or by other means to be intended for direct supply to final users for indoor use or use in aquaria.”

Scenario

Description 

Are the plants indoor plants?

1.

Aquatic plants for sale in a pet shop/garden centre

 

Yes

2.

Plants displayed in a house, conservatory, or atrium

 

Yes – as long as the plants have been packaged and labelled in a way for final users

 

3.

Plants that are intended to be grown for their whole life in a domestic greenhouse (whether heated, or unheated)

Yes – if it is clear from packaging/labelling that the plants are not intended for growing outdoors

4.

Plants of a genera/species which are suitable for growing outside in some situations, but are clearly packaged/labelled as for indoor use only (e.g. potted herbs, for kitchen use)

Yes – but only if clearly packaged/labelled as such.  If not, then such plants should not be regarded as for indoor use.

5.

Plants that are clearly packaged/labelled as houseplants, but which householders may choose to plant outside at a later stage (e.g. potted flowering bulbs)

Yes – but only if clearly packaged/labelled as such.  If not, then such plants should not be regarded as for indoor use.

 

6.

Plants that are going to be grown in a commercial greenhouse

No – as they are not packaged in a way intended for direct supply to final users

7.

Plants that are intended to be kept outside in summer, but may be brought inside in winter to protect from frost

No – as they are not intended for indoor use

8.

Plants that are produced/propagated in a greenhouse in their early life, for planting outside later

No – as they are not intended for indoor use

What is seed for trial or testing?

Scenario

Description

Are the seeds for trial or testing?

1.

Seed imported into GB for tests and trial purposes, that are not destined or eligible for further marketing, not intended to produce a crop which is destined for marketing and are destroyed after trials are completed.

Yes

 

Bulbs for direct retail sale, commercial flower production or for propagation?

Scenario

Description

Are the bulbs for direct retail sale, commercial flower production or for propagation?

1.

Imported and intended for the final user to commercially grow them on to produce cut flowers, with the bulbs then being destroyed. This applies to both direct and indirect (i.e. via another operator/business) supply to the final user.

Yes

2.

As above, but bulbs are used for multiplication (i.e. to produce further bulbs)

No

3.

Imported bulbs grown on, not for cut flowers, which are then supplied to a final user

No

 

Annex I Non- Woody plants

The statutory instrument definition takes precedent, however, the list of non-woody plants below will help you to identify whether the plant is needs to be declared as woody.

Non-woody plants such as:

Genus

Family

Abelmoschus

Malvaceae

Acanthospermum

Asteraceae

Achillea

Asteraceae

Ageratum

Asteraceae

Agrimonia

Rosaceae

Agropyrum

Poaceae

Ajuga

Lamiaceae

Albizia

Mimosaceae

Alcea

Malvaceae

Allium

Alliaceae

Alstroemeria

Alstroemeriaceae

Althaea

Malvaceae

Alyssum

Brassicaceae

Amaranthus

Amaranthaceae

Ambrosia

Asteraceae

Anagallis

Primulaceae

Anaphalis

Asteraceae

Anemone

Ranunculaceae

Anethum

Apiaceae

Anoda

Malvaceae

Anthriscus

Apiaceae

Antirrhinum

Scrophulariaceae

Apium

Apiaceae

Aquilegia

Ranunculaceae

Arabis

Brassicaceae

Arachis

Fabaceae

Arctium

Asteraceae

Argyranthemum

Asteraceae

Artemisia

Asteraceae

Asclepias

Asclepiadaceae

Aster

Asteraceae

Atriplex

Chenopodiaceae

Aubrietia

Brassicaceae

Avena

Poaceae

Baccharis

Asteraceae

Bacopa

Scrophulariiaceae

Basella

Basellaceae

Bauhinia

Fabaceae

Bellis

Asteraceae

Beta

Chenopodiaceae

Betonica

Lamiaceae

Bidens

Asteraceae

Bilderdykia

Polygonaceae

Borago

Boraginaceae

Brachycome

Asteraceae

Brassica

Brassicaceae

Brunnera

Boraginaceae

Bryonia

Cucurbitaceae

Bupleurum

Apiaceae

Cajanus

Fabaceae

Calendula

Asteraceae

Callistephus

Asteraceae

Calonyction

Convolvulaceae

Canavalia

Fabaceae

Capraria

Scrophulariaceae

Capsella

Brassicaceae

Capsicum

Solanaceae

Cardiospermum

Sapindaceae

Cardiuus

Asteraceae

Carthamus

Asteraceae

Cassia

Fabaceae

Celosia

Amaranthaceae

Centaurea

Asteraceae

Centranthus

Valerianaceae

Centrosema

Fabaceae

Ceratosanthes

Cucurbitaceae

Cestrum

Solanaceae

Cheiranthus

Brassicaceae

Chelone

Scropulariaceae

Chenopodium

Chenopodiaceae

Chrysanthemum

Asteraceae

Cicer

Fabaceae

Cichorium

Asteraceae

Cineraria

Asteraceae

Cirsium

Asteraceae

Citrullus

Cucurbitaceae

Clematis

Ranunculaceae

Cleome

Capparidaceae

Conoclinium

Asteraceae

Conyza

Asteraceae

Cordia

Boraginaceae

Coriandrum

Apiaceae

Crotalaria

Fabaceae

Cucumis

Cucurbitaceae

Cucurbita

Cucurbitaceae

Cyclamen

Primulaceae

Cynara

Asteraceae

Dahlia

Asteraceae

Datura

Solanaceae

Daucus

Apiaceae

Delilia

Asteraceae

Delphinium

Ranunculaceae

Dendranthema

Asteraceae

Desmodium

Fabaceae

Dianthus

Caryophyllaceae

Diascia

Scrophulariiaceae

Digitaria

Poaceae

Dimorphotheca

Asteraceae

Dracaena

Asparagaceae

Eclipta

Asteraceae

Elvira

Asteraceae

Emilia

Asteraceae

Erechtites

Asteraceae

Erigeron

Asteraceae

Eruca

Brassicaceae

Eryngium

Apiaceae

Erysimum

Brassicaceae

Eupatorium

Asteraceae

Eustoma

Gentianaceae

Exacum

Gentianaceae

Felicia

Asteraceae

Flaveria

Asteraceae

Fragaria

Rosaceae

Fuchsia

Onagraceae

Gaillardia

Asteraceae

Galega

Fabaceae

Galinsoga

Asteraceae

Gazania

Asteraceae

Geranium

Geraniaceae

Gerbera

Asteraceae

Gladiolus

Iridaceae

Glechoma

Lamiaceae

Glycine

Fabaceae

Gnaphalium

Asteraceae

Gossypium

Malvaceae

Gypsophila

Caryophyllaceae

Helianthus

Asteraceae

Helichrysum

Asteraceae

Heuchera

Saxifragaceae

Hibiscus

Malvaceae

Holmskioldia

Verbenaceae

Hordeum

Poaceae

Hyacinthus

Asparagaceae

Hydrocotyle

Apaiceae

Hymenopappus

Asteraceae

Hyptis

Laminisceae

Impatiens

Balsaminaceae

Indigofera

Fabaceae

Ipomoea

Convolvulaceae

Jasminum

Oleaceae

Kallstroemia

Zygophyllaceae

Kennedia

Fabaceae

Lactuca

Asteraceae

Lamium

Lamiaceae

Lannea

Anacardiaceae

Lantana

Verbenaceae

Lathyrus

Fabaceae

Launaea

Asteraceae

Lepidium

Brassicaceae

Leucanthemum

Asteraceae

Limonium

Plumbaginaceae

Linaria

Scrophulariaceae

Linum

Linaceae

Lipochaeta

Asteraceae

Lisianthus

Gentianaceae

Lupinus

Fabaceae

Lycopersicon

Solanaceae

Lysimachia

Primulaceae

Malva

Malvaceae

Marah

Cucurbitaceae

Matricaria

Asteraceae

Matthiola

Brassicaceae

Medicago

Fabaceae

Melanthera

Asteraceae

Melilotus

Fabaceae

Meliococcus

Sapindaceae

Melissa

Lamiaceae

Melothria

Cucurbitaceae

Mercurialis

Eurphorbiaceae

Mikania

Asteraceae

Molucella

Lamiaceae

Momordica

Curcurbitaceae

Moringa

Moringaceae

Muscari

Musaceae

Narcissus

Amaryllidaceae

Nasturnium

Brassicaceae

Nepeta

Lamiaceae

Nicotiana

Solanaceae

Ocimum

Lamiaceae

Oenothera

Onagraceae

Oxalis

Oxalidaceae

Paeonia

Paeoniaceae

Papaver

Papaveraceae

Parthenium

Asteraceae

Passiflora

Passifloraceae

Pastinaca

Apiaceae

Pelargonium

Geraniaceae

Penstemon

Scrophulariiaceae

Peperomia

Piperaceae

Pericallis

Asteraceae

Peristrophe

Acanthaceae

Petasites

Asteraceae

Petroselinum

Apaiceae

Petunia

Solanaceae

Phalaenopsis

Orchidaceae

Phaseolus

Fabaceae

Phlox

Poleminiaceae

Phyllanthus

Euphorbiaceae

Physalis

Solanaceae

Picris

Asteraceae

Piper

Piperaceae

Piriqueta

Turneraceae

Pisum

Fabaceae

Plantago

Plantaginaceae

Poinsettia

Euphorbiaceae

Poissonia

Fabaceae

Polemonium

Polemoniaceae

Polygonum

Polygonaceae

Portulaca

Portulacaceae

Primula

Primulaceae

Pterocaulon

Asteraceae

Pupalia

Amaranthaceae

Rajania

Dioscoreaceae

Ranunculus

Ranunculaceae

Raphanus

Brassicaceae

Rhynchosia

Fabaceae

Ricinus

Euphorbiaceae

Rorippa

Brassicaceae

Rumex

Polygonaceae

Ruspolia

Acanthaceae

Saponaria

Caryophyllaceae

Scaevola

Goodeniaceae

Senecio

Asteraceae

Senecioides

Asteraceae

Sida

Malvaceae

Sidalcea

Malvaceae

Silybum

Asteraceae

Sisymbrium

Brassicaceae

Solanum

Solanaceae

Solidago

Asteraceae

Solidaster

Asteraceae

Sonchus

Asteraceae

Sphaeranthus

Asteraceae

Spilanthes

Asteraceae

Spinacia

Chenopodiaceae

Stachys

Lamiaceae

Stellaria

Caryolphyllaceae

Sutera

Scrophulariaceae

Synedrella

Asteraceae

Tagetes

Asteraceae

Tanacetum

Asteraceae

Taraxacum

Asteraceae

Tetragonia

Aizoaceae

Thlaspi

Brassicaceae

Thunbergia

Acanthaceae

Thymus

Lamiaceae

Tillandsia

Bromeliaceae

Tithonia

Asteraceae

Torenia

Scrophulariiaceae

Trachelium

Campanulaceae

Tragopogon

Asteraceae

Tribulus

Zygophyllaceae

Tridax

Asteraceae

Trifolium

Fabaceae

Trigonella

Fabaceae

Tropaeolum

Tropaeolaceae

Tussilago

Asteraceae

Typha

Typhaceae

Valerianella

Valerianaceae

Verbena

Verbenaceae

Verbesina

Asteraceae

Vernonia

Asteraceae

Vicia

Fabaceae

Vigna

Fabaceae

Viola

Violaceae

Wedelia

Asteraceae

Whithania

Solanaceae

Xanthium

Asteraceae

Yucca

Asparagaceae

Zea

Poaceae

Zinnia

Asteraceae